A Tasmanian Consumer Engagement Strategy

This report documents a consultation process to develop a consumer engagement strategy for the homelessness sector in Tasmania. As well as reviewing the literature, consultations were held with people who are or have been homeless, with specialist homeless service providers and with those involved in practising consumer engagement in a range of sectors including the homelessness sector. The work was …

Shelter Tas Budget Submission, 2017-18

Our submission sets out recommendations that promote affordable housing across Tasmania, with a focus on assisting low income and disadvantage households. It has been developed in consultation with Shelter Tas members and other key stakeholders and has been endorsed by the Shelter Tas Executive Committee. Read more…

Shelter Tas Annual Report 2016

It’s been another great year for Shelter Tas, in no small part due to our dynamic staff and dedicated Shelter Management Committee. Over the past twelve months we have been reviewing our governance model. This has led us to make some changes to our Constitution to ensure the roles of the SMC and Executive are clearly defined. Whilst these changes …

Consequences of defunding the NPAH

Australia is at a critical juncture in how it funds and provides for some of its most vulnerable people. A decision by the Federal Government to defund the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (NPAH), if enacted, will result in significant impact on State and Territory ability to provide dynamic services that strive to prevent or end homelessness for people in …

NPAH Factsheet

Homelessness is a serious problem in Tasmania. It is largely hidden and impacts on all age groups. Around 40% of our 1,579 homeless Tasmanians are less than 24 years old, 15% are less than 9 years old, and increasingly older people are also facing homelessness. National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (NPAH) funds make a significant contribution towards the provision of …

National Shelter submission to the Productivity Commission report, Introducing competition and informed user choice into Human Services identifying sectors for reform

National Shelter is concerned the preliminary findings report does not properly identify the extent of the shortfall of housing in considering it’s appropriateness for reform or the extent to which informed user choice may be exercised. In 2012 the National Housing Supply Council estimated a shortfall of approximately 228,000 dwellings, with this shortfall projected to increase to 369,000 in 2016-17 …

Shelter Tas’ Response to the Productivity Commission Stage 1 Report, Human Services: identifying sectors for reform

Both National Shelter and the community housing sector submission identified social and affordable housing as a key area for reform, which we support. However, Shelter Tas does not support these reforms in relation to Specialist Homelessness Services. This submission follows our  initial submission lodged at the commencement of the Inquiry in July 2016, and specifically addresses Specialist Homelessness Services. Read …

Introducing Competition and Informed User Choice into Human Services – Productivity Commission Preliminary Findings Report

High-quality human services, such as health and education, underpin economic and social participation. Access to high-quality human services contributes to the wellbeing of individuals and the welfare of the community as a whole. Community welfare is enhanced by the social cohesion and equity benefits of people having access to a minimum level of human services, regardless of their means or …

Housing and Homelessness Strategy 2016-2019 – City of Hobart

This Housing and Homelessness Strategy 2016 – 2019 provides the City of Hobart with a framework for the organisation to make informed and strategically beneficial decisions in relation to housing and homelessness. This framework operates as a reference for identifying strategic opportunities and planning organisational activities to ensure the best possible outcomes for the people of Hobart. It clearly outlines the …